Write Tight – Action Verbs & Descriptive Nouns Equal Good Grammar

By Kenton Verhoeff

Grammar isn’t really my favorite topic, but I use it every time I sit down at the keyboard or pick up a pencil. Is it any good? You can be the judge of that.

writer tipsLearning to write tight means to cut the slop out of your words. If there’s room to cut, do it. Get to the point, get there fast. Don’t waste your time writing what you wouldn’t waste your time reading. Wow! That’s a full thought.

When I started writing, nobody told me to keep it short. I did that naturally. I don’t use a lot of extra words. I say what I want to say, get it said, and go outside to play. I don’t waste time. But, since Mom is a writer, and I’m learning this trade, she thought I needed to learn about Verbs & Nouns. (I’ll learn capitalization next week.)

Nouns are words that tell who or what you’re talking about. Used the right way, they can describe your characters in vivid color. Flavor your writing with decadence and your words snap off the pages. Wordsmiths create worlds with language. Vibrant nouns generate interesting characters.

A few nouns used commonly: man, woman, girl, boy, car, house… These all tell you something, but is it enough? Isn’t there more? What if we used more colorful words: blacksmith, secretary, schoolgirl, athlete, Ferrari, mansion? Don’t those words convey more life?

Verbs suggest action. Passive verbs exist in the sentence, composing structure and giving nouns a place to be. Active verbs bring nouns to life, giving them focus and achievement. Passive verbs: is, are, was, were… Active verbs: gasped, rush, charged, ran, grab.

Kenton Verhoeff home schools and sells his book “Corky the Happy Lizard” on his website at http://kentonverhoeff.com and you can learn how he does it by clicking on his link.

� 2007 – Kenton Verhoeff
All rights reserved.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kenton_Verhoeff
http://EzineArticles.com/?Write-Tight—Action-Verbs-and-Descriptive-Nouns-Equal-Good-Grammar&id=882492